Kamala Harris is our new VP, and that holds different meanings for people

2020-11-18T13:52:02+00:00November 9th, 2020|

Daily Kos

“The victim narrative and rescue mentality that most Democrats take around sex work is not helpful,” said RJ Thompson, a human rights lawyer, longtime sex worker, and director of the Sex Workers Project. “We do not need to be rescued, we need our human rights protected.”

SWP Receives Historic $1.2M Grant from the Sex Work Rights Fund

2020-09-21T15:52:50+00:00September 21st, 2020|

SWRF has made a generous donation of $1.2 million to SWP to significantly increase SWP’s capacity, size, scope, and impact. With this gift, SWP is able to hire a Director of Communications, Director of Development, Director of Research, Organizing, and Advocacy, and an Associate Director for State and Local Campaigns, as well as locally based organizing consultants. While continuing to focus on legislative efforts in New York, SWP will also focus on building a statewide campaign in Oregon to decriminalize and destigmatize sex work, partnering with SWR and other national, statewide, and local human rights organizations through 2020 and beyond.

Call off your old, tired ethics

2020-09-28T18:28:06+00:00September 18th, 2020|

The Minnesota Daily

Testimonies from New York to Los Angeles tell the same story: officers aren’t above privacy violations, enforced acts of public nudity and inappropriate physical contact. The Sex Workers Project of the Urban Justice Center in New York City found that 17% of sex workers had been sexually harassed, abused or even raped by police officers.

‘I have a mortgage to pay’: Sex workers banned from small-business loans under CARES Act due to ‘prurient sexual nature’

2020-07-06T15:10:32+00:00May 24th, 2020|

Market Watch

“Sex workers are heavily affected by measures such as social distancing and business shutdowns because they simply cannot go to their workplaces anymore, and are seeing a sharp decrease in their clients. Unlike employees from ‘mainstream’ businesses, many sex workers are not eligible for unemployment benefits,” says Lynn Liu, the development and communications associate at the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center in New York City.

Remembering Lorena Borjas, the Mother of a Trans Latinx Community

2020-07-06T15:10:58+00:00April 2nd, 2020|

The first time Lynly Egyes met her, Borjas pulled a birth certificate out of the bag. Egyes was then a lawyer with the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center and had recently taken the case of a young immigrant transgender woman who was in jail, facing felony assault charges for defending herself against an attacker—an exceedingly common predicament.

An Activist, a Warrior, a Mother to So Many: Lorena Borjas, Pillar of New York Trans Community, Dies From Coronavirus

2020-07-06T15:11:29+00:00March 31st, 2020|

Time Magazine

Egyes, 38, says she first met Borjas while working for the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center. At the time, Egyes remembers she was representing two incarcerated transgender women; Borjas “just showed up” with a much-needed birth certificate for one of the women, pulling it out of the Mary Poppins roller bag she always carried with her.

These Transgender Latinas Want New York State to Decriminalize Sex Work

2020-07-06T15:13:08+00:00July 18th, 2019|

The Daily Beast

Jessica Peñaranda is director of movement building at the Sex Workers Project. An advocate of Decrim NY, she said there is still plenty to be done. “Until we can have fair wages, affordable housing, and a welfare system, society will continue to punish sex-workers. There are so many things to do to bring every part of the system together as a community.”

Bill that could protect trafficking survivors from deportation has yet to reach floor in Albany

2020-07-06T15:13:52+00:00June 12th, 2019|

Queens Daily Eagle

“Trafficking is a lot more complex than that,” said Rosie Wang, director of Legal Advocacy and Services at the Sex Workers Project of the Urban Justice Center. “Traffickers will force their victims to do criminal actions for them, like shoplifting and carrying drugs. They’re not eligible for relief because they’re not prostitution-related but they are trafficking-related.”